Directory   |   Contact Us   |   Sign In   |   Join Us
News & Press: Policy

Save Medicaid in the Schools!

Tuesday, March 21, 2017   (1 Comments)
Posted by: Denise Marshall
Share |
 

The American Health Care Act (AHCA) jeopardizes healthcare for the nation’s most vulnerable children: students with disabilities and students in poverty. Specifically, the AHCA reneges on Medicaid’s 50+ year commitment to provide America’s children with access to vital healthcare services that ensure they have adequate educational opportunities and can contribute to society by imposing a per-capita cap and shifting current and future costs to taxpayers in every state and Congressional district.  While children currently comprise almost half of all Medicaid beneficiaries, less than one in five dollars is spent by Medicaid on children. Accordingly, a per-capita cap, even one that is based on different groups of beneficiaries, will disproportionally harm children’s access to care, including services received at school.

Considering these unintended consequences, we urge a ‘no” vote on The American Health Care Act (AHCA).

Medicaid is a cost-effective and efficient provider of essential health care services for children. School-based Medicaid programs serve as a lifeline to children who can’t access critical health care and health services outside of their school. Under this bill, the bulk of the mandated costs of providing health care coverage would be shifted to the States even though health needs and costs of care for children will remain the same or increase.  Most analyses of the AHCA project that the Medicaid funding shortfall in support of these mandated services will increase, placing states at greater risk year after year. The federal disinvestment in Medicaid imposed by the AHCA will force States and local communities to increase taxes and reduce or eliminate various programs and services, including other non-Medicaid services. The unintended consequences of the AHCA will force states to cut eligibility, services, and benefits for children.

The projected loss of $880 billion in federal Medicaid dollars will compel States to ration health care for children. Under the per-capita caps included in the AHCA, health care will be rationed and schools will be forced to compete with other critical health care providers—hospitals, physicians, and clinics— that serve Medicaid-eligible children. School-based health services are mandated on the States and those mandates do not cease simply because Medicaid funds are capped by the AHCA. As with many other unfunded mandates, capping Medicaid merely shifts the financial burden of providing services to the States.

Medicaid Enables Schools to Provide Critical Health Care for Students

A school’s primary responsibility is to provide students with a high-quality education. However, children cannot learn to their fullest potential with unmet health needs. As such, school district personnel regularly provide critical health services to ensure that all children are ready to learn and able to thrive alongside their peers. Schools deliver health services effectively and efficiently since school is where children spend most of their days. Increasing access to health care services through Medicaid improves health care and educational outcomes for students. Providing health and wellness services for students in poverty and services that benefit students with disabilities ultimately enables more children to become employable and attend higher-education.

Since 1988, Medicaid has permitted payment to schools for certain medically-necessary services provided to children under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) through an individualized education program (IEP) or individualized family service program (IFSP). Schools are thus eligible to be reimbursed for direct medical services to Medicaid-eligible students with an IEP or IFSP. In addition, districts can receive Medicaid reimbursements for providing Early Periodic Screening Diagnostic and Treatment Benefits (EPSDT), which provide Medicaid-eligible children under age 21 with a broad array of diagnosis and treatment services. The goal of EPSDT is to assure that health problems are diagnosed and treated as early as possible before the problems become complex and treatment is more expensive.

School districts use their Medicaid reimbursement funds in a variety of ways to help support the learning and development of the children they serve. In a 2017 survey of school districts, district officials reported that two-thirds of Medicaid dollars are used to support the work of health professionals and other specialized instructional support personnel (e.g., speech-language pathologists, audiologists, occupational therapists, school psychologists, school social workers, and school nurses) who provide comprehensive health and mental health services to students. Districts also use these funds to expand the availability of a wide range of health and mental health services available to students in poverty, who are more likely to lack consistent access to healthcare professionals. Further, some districts depend on Medicaid reimbursements to purchase and update specialized equipment (e.g., walkers, wheelchairs, exercise equipment, special playground equipment, and equipment to assist with hearing and seeing) as well as assistive technology for students with disabilities to help them learn alongside their peers.

School districts would stand to lose much of their funding for Medicaid under the Committee’s proposal. Schools currently receive roughly $4 billion in Medicaid reimbursements each year. Yet under this proposal, states would no longer have to consider schools as eligible Medicaid providers, which would mean that districts would have the same obligation to provide services for students with disabilities under IDEA, but no Medicaid dollars to provide medically-necessary services. Schools would be unable to provide EPSDT to students, which would mean screenings and treatment that take place in school settings would have to be moved to physician offices or hospital emergency rooms, where some families may not visit regularly or where costs are much higher.

In addition, basic health screenings for vision, hearing, and mental health problems for students would no longer be possible, making these problems more difficult to address and expensive to treat. Moving health screenings out of schools also reduces access to early identification and treatment, which also leads to more costly treatment down the road. Efforts by schools to enroll eligible students in Medicaid, as required, would also decline.

Call your Senators and Representatives today by calling one toll-free number (844-USA-0234) and entering your zip code.   Now is the time for ACTION, remember every call matters!  Don’t let Congress take away health care and services for millions of people and replace it with a plan that CUTS Medicaid.

 
Upcoming Events 
 

Event:

Press Conference Event on American Health Care Act

Date:

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Time:

10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Place:

East front of the U.S. Capitol, on the House side, which faces the Supreme Court (outdoors)

Speakers:

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi joined by former Vice President Joe Biden and others

 

 ~~~~~~

Event:

#SaveMedicaid Press Conference Event

Date:

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Time:

11:00 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Place:

East side of the Capitol across from the Senate (outdoors)

Speakers:

Senator Bob Casey and other Members

Comments...

Keith Caldwell says...
Posted Friday, May 5, 2017
I was unpleasantly surprised to learn that the proposal to strip $880 Billion away from the program that provides invaluable financial support to our children with disabilities passed the House yesterday. What can we do as the parents of children with disabilities to stop this bill from becoming law? I am the executive director of a parent driven advocacy organization dedicated to helping our children and are concerned about how this will negatively impact our kids now and in the future. Other parents should consider joining our efforts by visiting our website at www.advocacy.allchildrenmatter.us/voice We need to come together as parent advocates to ensure that our kids get the supports and services they need. We need to support organizations like COPPA to make sure all of our voices are heard on issues that affect us all, whether democrat or republican.

Membership Management Software Powered by YourMembership  ::  Legal